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dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Helen
dc.contributor.authorSnow, Peggy
dc.date2021-06-30T22:29:41.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-08T14:39:11Z
dc.date.available2021-09-08T14:39:11Z
dc.identifierrepository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol39/iss1/6
dc.identifier.urihttps://westcollections.wcsu.edu/handle/20.500.12945/1303
dc.description.abstract<p>Deafness is the invisible, unseen sensory anomaly that is difficult for hearing individuals to understand. Deaf and hard of hearing children look the same as other children and have the same cognitive abilities as hearing children; they ambulate, laugh, cry, and have the same basic needs. Research data supports the fact that when intelligence instruments are used that do not rely on verbal and language processing abilities the results show that there is no difference in performance between hearing and hearing impaired children (Moores 2001; Vemon 1990). There is the same range of intelligence for both groups. However there is one difference between the two groups, deaf and hard of hearing children do not have the same language skills to express themselves and most of them experience difficulty receiving and processing aural(spoken) communication (Reward 2003). As a result, many deaf and hard of hearing children develop feelings of isolation.</p>
dc.titleThe Value of Art Therapy: An Intervention to Enhance Emotional Health of Children with Hearing Loss
wcsu.oldurlhttps://repository.wcsu.edu/jadara/vol39/iss1/6
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.subject.keywordnone
wcsu.oldid1427
dc.source.peer_reviewedtrue


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