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dc.contributorThe authors would like to gratefully acknowledge Greg Hatchett for his mentorship and feedback throughout the process. Thanks are also due to colleagues and friends, past and present, whose guidance, feedback, and support have been invaluable.
dc.contributor.authorCoaston, Susannah
dc.contributor.authorCook, Ellen
dc.date2021-06-30T22:20:36.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-08T14:44:13Z
dc.date.available2021-09-08T14:44:13Z
dc.identifierrepository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol10/iss1/8
dc.identifier.urihttps://westcollections.wcsu.edu/handle/20.500.12945/1843
dc.description.abstract<p>This study explored the experience of burnout in counselor education faculty, and how it relates to perceived worklife fit and turnover intention. Participants experienced a moderate level of burnout in the areas of exhaustion, cynicism, and professional inefficacy. The results of a MANOVA revealed that male and female participants differed on a composite measure of burnout, fit, and turnover intention, but there were no significant multivariate differences based on race or tenure status. Both cynicism and perceived worklife fit uniquely contributed to the prediction of turnover intention, together explaining 29% of the total variance in turnover intention. Further directions for research in this population were discussed.</p>
dc.titleBurnout in Counselor Education: The Role of Cynicism and Fit in Predicting Turnover Intention
dc.title.alternativeBURNOUT AND THE ROLE OF CYNICISM AND FIT
wcsu.oldurlhttps://repository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol10/iss1/8
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.subject.keywordburnout
dc.subject.keywordcounselor education
dc.subject.keywordturnover intention
wcsu.oldid1211
dc.source.peer_reviewedtrue


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