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dc.contributorThe authors wish to thank Thomas Cooke and Alicia Homrich for their contributions to this research study.
dc.contributor.authorChang, Victor
dc.contributor.authorRubel, Deborah
dc.date2021-06-30T22:24:49.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-08T14:44:47Z
dc.date.available2021-09-08T14:44:47Z
dc.identifierrepository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol12/iss4/11
dc.identifier.urihttps://westcollections.wcsu.edu/handle/20.500.12945/1895
dc.description.abstract<p>Counselor educators practice gatekeeping to graduate only students who are ethical and competent, yet students with problems of professional competence (PPC) continue to graduate. Gatekeeping challenges include personal, pedagogical, administrative, ethical, and legal concerns, and gatekeeping has been characterized as a taxing emotional and social process. Specific knowledge about counselor educators’ internal experiences during gatekeeping is limited. Researchers asked how do counselor educators experience their internal reactions during gatekeeping processes for PPC? Researchers interviewed counselor educators about their gatekeeping experiences and analyzed data using grounded theory methods. The authors propose a grounded theory of <em>striving to be an effective gatekeeper </em>that describes participants’ internal experiences of gatekeeping and will benefit counselor educators, students, and the public good.</p>
dc.titleCounselor Educators’ Internal Experiences of Gatekeeping
dc.title.alternativeCounselor Educators’ Internal Experiences of Gatekeeping
wcsu.oldurlhttps://repository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol12/iss4/11
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.subject.keywordgatekeeping
dc.subject.keywordcounselor educators
dc.subject.keywordgrounded theory
wcsu.oldid1351
dc.source.peer_reviewedtrue


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