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dc.contributorWilliam R. Sterner, School of Counseling, Marymount University; Stephanie F. Hall, School of Health Sciences, Emory & Henry College; David Burkholder, Department of Psychological Counseling, Monmouth University. Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to: William R. Sterner, School of Counseling, Marymount University, 2807 N. Glebe Road, Arlington, VA 22207 (e-mail: wsterner@marymount.edu)
dc.contributor.authorSterner, William
dc.contributor.authorHall, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorBurkholder, David
dc.date2021-06-30T22:50:31.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-08T14:45:36Z
dc.date.available2021-09-08T14:45:36Z
dc.identifierrepository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol14/iss2/3
dc.identifier.urihttps://westcollections.wcsu.edu/handle/20.500.12945/1960
dc.description.abstract<p>The Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS) is a commonly used overall measure of perceived spiritual quality of life. The SWBS has been demonstrated as a valid and reliable measure, however questions and concerns exist regarding its construct validity. Further, a paucity of empirical literature exists examining the construct of spiritual well-being within the counseling profession. Using data from a study with 415 master’s level counseling students, the authors examined goodness-of-fit for the SWBS of one, two, three, and five-factor models identified in the literature. Results indicated no model yielded good fit. Implications and future research are discussed.</p>
dc.titleAn Examination of Confirmatory Factor Analytic Models of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale
dc.title.alternativeExamining CFA Models of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale
wcsu.oldurlhttps://repository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol14/iss2/3
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.subject.keywordConfirmatory Factor Analysis
dc.subject.keywordSpiritual Well-Being Scale
dc.subject.keywordConstruct validity
wcsu.oldid1430
dc.source.peer_reviewedtrue


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