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dc.contributor.authorBurt, Isaac
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Tiphanie
dc.contributor.authorSwank, Jacqueline
dc.contributor.authorAscher, David
dc.date2021-06-30T22:17:52.000
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-08T14:45:45Z
dc.date.available2021-09-08T14:45:45Z
dc.date.issued2011-04-01T00:00:00-07:00
dc.identifierrepository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol3/iss1/2
dc.identifier.urihttps://westcollections.wcsu.edu/handle/20.500.12945/1976
dc.description.abstract<p>As advancements in technology continue to revolutionize the field of counseling, certain populations of students still encounter difficulties incorporating technology in the classroom. Non-traditional students, many who possesses years of professional experience, struggle academically due to a lack of technological expertise and knowledge. Low technological expertise potentially decreases students’ self-efficacy, enjoyment, and performance (Baturay & Bay, 2010). Consequently, it is imperative that counselor educators use a variety of strategies with non-traditional students struggling with technology. Thus, the purpose of this article is to propose guidelines encompassing self-efficacy, the evolution of technology and competencies required for assisting students in the classroom.</p>
dc.titleAddressing the Technology Gap in Counselor Education: Identification of Characteristics in Students that Affect Learning in College Classrooms
wcsu.oldurlhttps://repository.wcsu.edu/jcps/vol3/iss1/2
dc.source.statuspublished
dc.subject.keywordTechnology
dc.subject.keywordcounselor education
dc.subject.keywordself-efficacy
dc.subject.keywordtechnology gap
dc.subject.keywordnon-traditional students
wcsu.oldid1023
dc.source.peer_reviewedtrue
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7729/31.1023


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