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dc.contributor.authorQuery, Patricia F.
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-20T16:27:12Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-25T18:52:34Z
dc.date.available2006-09-20T16:27:12Z
dc.date.available2022-07-25T18:52:34Z
dc.date.issued2006-09-20T16:27:12Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://westcollections.wcsu.edu/handle/20.500.12945/3039
dc.description.abstractThe social psychological issue of bystander intervention and helping behavior has been widely studied in a variety of situations ranging from direct observation of helping behavior to self-report indications of willingness or likelihood of helping. The understanding and insight into how and when people make decisions to help others can be an important one in areas of crime intervention, volunteerism, emergency situations and more. This study examined the effects of perceived responsibility of the person needing help and available time of the helper on willingness to help. The researcher hypothesized that the likelihood of helping would be higher when the helper had more time available and when the requester was perceived to be less responsible for his or her predicament. Results of the study did not support the hypothesis; however future studies could manipulate both the time and responsibility variables in a stronger way.
dc.format.extent51829 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjecthelping behavior
dc.subjectcrime intervention
dc.subjectvolunteerism
dc.subjectemergency situations
dc.titleAttitudes toward the willingness to help
dc.typeArticle


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