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dc.contributor.authorPavelo, Maria
dc.date.accessioned2006-09-20T16:28:38Z
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-25T18:54:19Z
dc.date.available2006-09-20T16:28:38Z
dc.date.available2022-07-25T18:54:19Z
dc.date.issued2006-09-20T16:28:38Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://westcollections.wcsu.edu/handle/20.500.12945/3044
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to investigate how drive for thinness moderates the influence of media on female body image and self-esteem. Drive for thinness is defined as an excessive concern with dieting, preoccupation with weight, and fear of weight gain. Forty-two female undergraduates taking Introductory and Cognitive Psychology classes completed a questionnaire measuring dieting behavior, with 21 exhibiting a high drive for thinness and 21 revealing a low drive for thinness. Participants recorded pleasure ratings as they viewed either 8 slides of thin female models or 8 slides of plus-size female models. They next answered 2 questionnaires, one measuring self-esteem and body image and the other a figure rating scale. Significant differences were found between the low and high drive for thinness groups, independent of the type of media image viewed. Participants with a high drive for thinness had lower self-esteem scores and greater negative body image.
dc.format.extent1596937 bytes
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.subjectbody image
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjectmedia
dc.subjectthinness
dc.subjectdieting
dc.subjectweight
dc.subjectSelf-esteem
dc.titleHow drive for thinness moderates the influence of media on female body image
dc.typeArticle


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