The Effect of Disclosed Personal Information on Impression Formation

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Authors
Shorey, Stephanie J.
Issue Date
2009-02-19T20:17:50Z
Item Type
Article
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Academic Department
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item.page.dc.subject.keywords
Keyword
personal information , disclosure , impression formation , impression , stigma , stigmatized disease , disease
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Abstract
This study measured the effect of disclosed personal information on impression formation. Eight male and 23 female undergraduate students ranging in age from 18 to 41 were randomly assigned to read one of three descriptions of a hypothetical student who was either healthy, battling cancer, or HIV positive. It was hypothesized that participants would be less willing to accept the hypothetical student as a friend when a serious illness was present. Contrary to prediction, no significant difference in self-reported acceptance was found as a function of the health status of the hypothetical student. These results do not support the behavioral model which explains variation between stigmatized and non stigmatized diseases.
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