Student Opinion and Student Course Selection

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Authors
DellaGioia, Mike
Issue Date
2009-02-19T20:14:58Z
Item Type
Article
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Academic Department
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item.page.dc.subject.keywords
Keyword
student opinion , course selection , undergraduate , college , university , psychology
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Abstract
This study examined the effects of student opinion on course selection. Twenty-nine undergraduate psychology students read a course description similar to those offered by a university course catalogue, then read either one of two student opinions or no student opinion. After reading this information, participants completed a questionnaire that evaluated their thoughts on the course. First, it was predicted that if participants read a student opinion in addition to a course description, they would make significantly different decisions regarding the course. Second, it was predicted that these participants would also perceive the information as more helpful in arriving at their decisions. Contrary to both of these hypotheses, the presence or absence of a student opinion resulted in no significant effect on the participants' likelihood to take or recommend the course, or the extent to which they reported finding the information helpful in making these decisions.
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